© everlark

pulpatoon:

thenearsightedmonkey:

Dearest Students,

This is my own composition notebook homework assignment in progress. Professor Chewbacca reflects on the crayon experience. I’ve inked it and now I’m coloring it in

I like to figure out problems in my composition notebook using drawing and slow writing and non-photo blue pencil to help me with certain problems that defy being approached head on. I’ve found there is something to moving ones hand in a certain way — like a coloring way— while filling in a space and half thinking and half not-thinking about this something you are trying to figure out that invites possible answers to present themselves..

Sincerely,

Professor Chewbacca

From all appearances, Lynda Barry is continuing to teach the best class.

whataboutprom:

“In terms of like, instant relief, canceling plans is like heroin.” - John Mulaney

durendals:

on a textual level, a female character can dress however she wants and shouldn’t be slut-shamed and hated for what she prefers to wear.

on a metatextual level, she might still have been designed with an intention to provide fanservice.

this means that criticising a design, as opposed to a character, is neither misogyny nor slut-shaming. being displeased about the way a character has been designed is not synonymous with hating her. 

have i made myself clear?

whoistorule:

The thing about that Shae/Tyrion scene that’s so amazing is how incredibly expertly manipulative she is?  Because she’s not jealous of Ros, and she doesn’t care, but the more she makes him think she does, the more she has him on the leash, and the more afraid he becomes that he’ll give her some reason to leave him.  She toys with him and she genuinely cares about him, but she will not hesitate to sell him out if need be, because Shae cares about Shae first (and Sansa second) and it’s perfect.

"

The fundamentally conservative nature of the marriage contract is why, I think, younger conservatives are growing more supportive of same sex marriage. Extending marriage rights to LGBT people does little or nothing to address the structure of oppressive family laws and values in society. It also does very little to change the core of the conservative agenda which is, fundamentally, about power and control. This is evidenced by the fact that young conservatives are increasingly supportive of same-sex marriage at the same time that they continue to be champions of austerity who are deeply opposed to public funding of critical safety net programs. And many are terrible on issues of race, equating black and brown people with destructively out-of-control sexuality, crime, and government debt. So their attitudes about LGBT people may have changed, but their worldviews remain pretty much the same. They’ve just let monogamous same sex couples off the hook for certain societal problems, which is essentially what they’ve been doing all along for heterosexuals who marry.

What appears to be leading to this “success” with young conservatives points to another of my concerns. By presenting LGB (I’ll leave off the “t” here) people as basically conservative in our demands, the most mainstream faction within the LGB movement is subtly positioning us as a model minority. And it’s working. Where once attacks against LGB people relied heavily on messaging that mirrored prejudices historically used against people of color (morally debased sexual predators and criminals seeking anti-American special rights), LGB people are increasingly understood to be all-American and fundamentally non-threatening. The sales job basically seems to revolve around the idea that if you let us in, nothing really changes. And, based on the demands at the center of this agenda, this is, to a degree, true.

Also troubling is my sense that the current strategies ignore something about marriage rights that ought to be obvious to anyone excluded from them, especially when that group is arguing that being excluded has real, material consequences. That is, that we are arguing to be able to use marriage as a shield against wrongs that no one, regardless of sexual orientation or marital status, should suffer. No loved one should be excluded from survivors benefits and pensions, end of life decision-making, hospital visitation, and the many other family rights reserved for married couples. And when we argue that being able to wield this shield is a right we deserve because we conform with the values of good people, that shield can become a weapon against those who are still excluded.

"

 
informate:


“Nubia Baptiste had spent some 665 days at her Washington, D.C., public school by the time she walked into second period on March 27, 2012. She was an authority on McKinley Technology High School. She knew which security guards to befriend and where to hide out to skip class (try the bleachers). She knew which teachers stayed late to write college recommendation letters for students; she knew which ones patrolled the halls like guards in a prison yard, barking at kids to disperse.
If someone had asked, she could have revealed things about her school that no adult could have known. Once Nubia got talking, she had plenty to say. But until that morning of her senior spring, no one had ever asked.
She sat down at her desk and pulled her long, neat dreadlocks behind her shoulders. Then her teacher passed out a form. Must be another standardized test, Nubia figured, to be finished and forgotten. She picked up her pencil. By senior year, it was a reflex. The only sound was the hum of the air conditioning.
Teachers in the hallway treat me with respect, even if they don’t know me.
Well, this was different. She chose an answer from a list: Sometimes.
This class feels like a happy family.
She arched an eyebrow. Was this a joke? Totally untrue.
In towns around the country this past school year, a quarter-­million students took a special survey designed to capture what they thought of their teachers and their classroom culture. Unlike the vast majority of surveys in human history, this one had been carefully field-tested. That research had shown something remarkable: if you asked kids the right questions, they could identify, with uncanny accuracy, their most—and least—effective teachers.”
- Amanda Ripley, Why Kids Should Grade Teachers

informate:

“Nubia Baptiste had spent some 665 days at her Washington, D.C., public school by the time she walked into second period on March 27, 2012. She was an authority on McKinley Technology High School. She knew which security guards to befriend and where to hide out to skip class (try the bleachers). She knew which teachers stayed late to write college recommendation letters for students; she knew which ones patrolled the halls like guards in a prison yard, barking at kids to disperse.

If someone had asked, she could have revealed things about her school that no adult could have known. Once Nubia got talking, she had plenty to say. But until that morning of her senior spring, no one had ever asked.

She sat down at her desk and pulled her long, neat dreadlocks behind her shoulders. Then her teacher passed out a form. Must be another standardized test, Nubia figured, to be finished and forgotten. She picked up her pencil. By senior year, it was a reflex. The only sound was the hum of the air conditioning.

Teachers in the hallway treat me with respect, even if they don’t know me.

Well, this was different. She chose an answer from a list: Sometimes.

This class feels like a happy family.

She arched an eyebrow. Was this a joke? Totally untrue.

In towns around the country this past school year, a quarter-­million students took a special survey designed to capture what they thought of their teachers and their classroom culture. Unlike the vast majority of surveys in human history, this one had been carefully field-tested. That research had shown something remarkable: if you asked kids the right questions, they could identify, with uncanny accuracy, their most—and least—effective teachers.”

Amanda Ripley, Why Kids Should Grade Teachers

la-copa-esta-bien:

fyabooks:

My Top 5 Favorite YA Authors: #4 Tamora Pierce

“I distrust any advice that contains the words ‘ought’ or ‘should’.” ― Tamora Pierce

I don’t think any YA Author list is complete without Tamora Pierce. Nor any childhood. I remember tearing through the Alanna books as a kid. If you are a fan of kickass girls breaking stereotypes and bending gender roles, then this is your lady.  Her writing is just so frank and honest and there’s something about it that really resonated with me as a kid. And most of all, I like how her female characters always make the choice that is right for her, right for the story, and Pierce NEVER panders to fan’s requests. This is especially true when it comes to love interests and plots. The story is never sacrificed in order to fulfill romantic fantasies. Even so, the characters all remain dynamic and true. When it comes to fierce lady knights, clever sorceresses, and brave rogues, there is no doubt that Pierce is queen.

crying because QUEEN TAMMY

stormborn-slytherin:

seriously let me tell you something about teenagers (particularly teenage girls)

there is a fucking television program entitled “i hate my teenage daughter”

and you fucking sit there and judge these young people going through hormonal and social and mental hell

while you make tv shows and parenting blogs about how fucking awful they are?

do you know what teenage girls REALLY are?

they’re fucking WORLDS of potential bursting out at the seams

in all their taylor swift worshipping, converse wearing, dollar store lip gloss glory

they are our fucking precious future and they barely even get a voice

because… they listen to pop music and read for fun and laugh loudly all the time in public, how very dare they

so fucking excuse me if i think it’s counter-productive to shame people for liking one direction or gossip girl or whatever the fuck

they are teetering on the precipice of adulthood and they experience an epiphany every minute 

teenage girls are allowed to like things

they are allowed to figure their shit out and make mistakes and shame on you and all of us for forgetting that they could teach us a thing or two about enthusiasm and horror and disgust and delight

pawneegoddess:

“@cadlymack: January Jones always looks like a Disney villain who lives in a cave of ice and drinks the blood of fairy godmothers.”

#I take that as a compliment

arieswym:

“I have an advantage because I’m the underdog and I’m black and no one thinks I’d ever win. Well, I’m going to inspire so many people. Everybody will be talking about, how did she come up so fast? But I’m ready to shine.” ~ Gabby Douglas

arieswym:

“I have an advantage because I’m the underdog and I’m black and no one thinks I’d ever win. Well, I’m going to inspire so many people. Everybody will be talking about, how did she come up so fast? But I’m ready to shine.” ~ Gabby Douglas

waterfights:

Your Heroes Aren’t All Straight, White, Dudes → Anastasia “Dee” Dualla

"I like a story when it’s done well. But just a scene, a split second, can seem like a story. That’s one thing that John Darnielle does so well; describing one second of life over a three minute song."

 
- David Tattersall (The Wave Pictures). (via bottleonthebookcase)

for queer folk to whom perceived heterosexuality is a turn on 

for queer folk to whom perceived heterosexuality is a turn on

here is a riddle

if the world sees us as it wills
which is to say
i seem like a woman and
you seem like a man
then what is it about the rocking of our hips that feels like rebellion?

does it have anything to do with how our first kiss was
in the backseat of a car
like so many high school vagrants
stopped by the cops five times too many
in states of undress under martial law?

what turns embracing into an act of revolution
is it how small spoon in yr arms I feel safe
and big spoon with my arms around you I feel safer?

is it the act of turning compulsory heterosexuality on its head
or the act of receiving head
watching my synthetic cock disappear inside yr glittering lips
you dirty man

know this
i have never felt so queer as when our lips found each other
as when you gave me yr number
as when you lifted me up against the wall
wrapped my legs around you
kissed you
like a blatant militant heterosexual
won’t someone think of the children! 

sexting as rebellion
fisting as resistance
loving you
from yr gender identity to yr bad hair cut
no matter how other people see us
as power