© everlark

"

Her 12-year-old cried when he told her what had happened and asked if he was stopped because he was black.

"Probably, yeah," she said.

"I just want to know, how long will this last?" he asked her.

That’s when she started to cry.

"For the rest of your life," she said.

"

 
- Black Moms Tell White Moms About the Race Talk, in light of the shooting of an unarmed black teenager in Ferguson, The Ethics Project invited black mothers to explain the heartbreaking reality of raising a black son in America.  (via starksandrecreation)
thepeoplesrecord:

Meet the Native American grandmother who just beat the RedskinsJune 18, 2014
The woman who was the driving force behind the cases that led the U.S. Patents and Trademarks Office to cancel the federal trademarks for the Washington Redskins Wednesday is 69-year-old grandmother and longtime Native American activist, Suzan Harjo. 
"Suzan has been fighting this since 1992. Native American people have been fighting this since 1972. … The reason it has come up recently is because Suzan has worked really hard to bring this in the public eye," Amanda Blackhorse, one of the five Native American plaintiffs in the case filed before the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board, told Business Insider.
"She’s just a tremendous woman. She’s a strong Native American woman, and I’m so happy to have met her and to have been a part of all this because this is what we need to do," Blackhorse added. 
Harjo was born in Oklahoma and is of Cheyenne and Muscogee ancestry. In a conversation with Business Insider shortly after the U.S. Patents and Trademarks Office’s decision was announced, Harjo said she became involved with political activism while she was still in school.
"One time when I was in school, I was selected by our Cheyenne leadership to come to Washington with them. And when my family asked, ‘Why do you want her to go?’ They said, ‘Because she talks good and she ain’t afraid of nobody.’ So, those became resumé items," Harjo recounted. 
In high school, Harjo was inspired to fight against what she describes as “racist stereotypes in American sports” because of an Oklahoma Native American activist named Clyde Warrior.
"He made a personal cause of getting rid of the mascot ‘Little Red’ at the University of Oklahoma," Harjo said of Warrior. "Most of the Indians in Oklahoma couldn’t stand ‘Little Red’ and we called him the dancing idiot. He was always portrayed by a white guy in Indian costume."
Little Red was eventually banished by University of Oklahoma President J. Herbert Hollomon in 1970.
According to Harjo, activists involved in the effort to eliminate Native American mascots always viewed the Washington Redskins football team as “the worst” offender.
"No matter where you went or what was the mascot fight of the moment in any locale, everyone would always say, ‘And the worst one is right there in the nation’s capital, the Washington team name,’" said Harjo. "It was the worst one, everyone pointed to it."
Harjo moved to Washington D.C. in 1974. Soon after her arrival, she said someone gave her and her husband tickets to a Redskins game.
"We’re football fans and we can separate the team name from the game, so we went to a game. And we didn’t stay for the game at all, because people started — someone said something, ‘Are you this or that?’ So, we started to answer, then people started like pulling our hair," explained Harjo. "And they would call us that name and it was very weird for us. So, we just left and never went to another game."
Harjo said her experience at the Redskins game “solidified” her opposition to stereotypical Native American sports mascots.
"That just solidified it for me because it wasn’t just namecalling, it was what the name had promoted," Harjo said. "That’s the example of what objectification is. You strip the person of humanity and they’re just an object and you can do anything.
You can pull their hair! I wouldn’t even touch someone else!”
Harjo, who eventually became the first president of the Morning Star Institute, a D.C.-based national Native rights organization, began looking for ways to change the Redskins name. She said she settled on the strategy of trying to get the team’s trademark canceled after she was contacted by a Minneapolis lawyer named Stephen Baird in 1992. 
According to Harjo, Baird was working on a law review article about his theory the Redskins’ trademark could be canceled based on a section of the U.S. Trademark Act prohibiting trademarks that “may disparage … persons, living or dead, institutions, beliefs, or national symbols.” Harjo said Baird heard she had “looked at all sorts of causes of action, and not settled on any of them, and had been talking with various attorneys about ways that we could approach this.” When Baird called her, Harjo said his “first question” was why she rejected using the Patent and Trademark Office as a forum to fight the Redskins name.
"And I said, ‘I have no idea what you’re talking about,’" Harjo remembered with a laugh. "Once he explained his theory, I was so intrigued by his theory. It was very different from the kinds of things we’d been looking at. … It didn’t interfere with free speech, it wasn’t even forcing a decision. What it’s saying is, ‘Here’s what the federal government will or will not sanction.’ Because, it’s the federal government’s role to grant the exclusive privilege of making money off this name."
Full article

thepeoplesrecord:

Meet the Native American grandmother who just beat the Redskins
June 18, 2014

The woman who was the driving force behind the cases that led the U.S. Patents and Trademarks Office to cancel the federal trademarks for the Washington Redskins Wednesday is 69-year-old grandmother and longtime Native American activist, Suzan Harjo. 

"Suzan has been fighting this since 1992. Native American people have been fighting this since 1972. … The reason it has come up recently is because Suzan has worked really hard to bring this in the public eye," Amanda Blackhorse, one of the five Native American plaintiffs in the case filed before the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board, told Business Insider.

"She’s just a tremendous woman. She’s a strong Native American woman, and I’m so happy to have met her and to have been a part of all this because this is what we need to do," Blackhorse added. 

Harjo was born in Oklahoma and is of Cheyenne and Muscogee ancestry. In a conversation with Business Insider shortly after the U.S. Patents and Trademarks Office’s decision was announced, Harjo said she became involved with political activism while she was still in school.

"One time when I was in school, I was selected by our Cheyenne leadership to come to Washington with them. And when my family asked, ‘Why do you want her to go?’ They said, ‘Because she talks good and she ain’t afraid of nobody.’ So, those became resumé items," Harjo recounted. 

In high school, Harjo was inspired to fight against what she describes as “racist stereotypes in American sports” because of an Oklahoma Native American activist named Clyde Warrior.

"He made a personal cause of getting rid of the mascot ‘Little Red’ at the University of Oklahoma," Harjo said of Warrior. "Most of the Indians in Oklahoma couldn’t stand ‘Little Red’ and we called him the dancing idiot. He was always portrayed by a white guy in Indian costume."

Little Red was eventually banished by University of Oklahoma President J. Herbert Hollomon in 1970.

According to Harjo, activists involved in the effort to eliminate Native American mascots always viewed the Washington Redskins football team as “the worst” offender.

"No matter where you went or what was the mascot fight of the moment in any locale, everyone would always say, ‘And the worst one is right there in the nation’s capital, the Washington team name,’" said Harjo. "It was the worst one, everyone pointed to it."

Harjo moved to Washington D.C. in 1974. Soon after her arrival, she said someone gave her and her husband tickets to a Redskins game.

"We’re football fans and we can separate the team name from the game, so we went to a game. And we didn’t stay for the game at all, because people started — someone said something, ‘Are you this or that?’ So, we started to answer, then people started like pulling our hair," explained Harjo. "And they would call us that name and it was very weird for us. So, we just left and never went to another game."

Harjo said her experience at the Redskins game “solidified” her opposition to stereotypical Native American sports mascots.

"That just solidified it for me because it wasn’t just namecalling, it was what the name had promoted," Harjo said. "That’s the example of what objectification is. You strip the person of humanity and they’re just an object and you can do anything.

You can pull their hair! I wouldn’t even touch someone else!”

Harjo, who eventually became the first president of the Morning Star Institute, a D.C.-based national Native rights organization, began looking for ways to change the Redskins name. She said she settled on the strategy of trying to get the team’s trademark canceled after she was contacted by a Minneapolis lawyer named Stephen Baird in 1992. 

According to Harjo, Baird was working on a law review article about his theory the Redskins’ trademark could be canceled based on a section of the U.S. Trademark Act prohibiting trademarks that “may disparage … persons, living or dead, institutions, beliefs, or national symbols.” Harjo said Baird heard she had “looked at all sorts of causes of action, and not settled on any of them, and had been talking with various attorneys about ways that we could approach this.” When Baird called her, Harjo said his “first question” was why she rejected using the Patent and Trademark Office as a forum to fight the Redskins name.

"And I said, ‘I have no idea what you’re talking about,’" Harjo remembered with a laugh. "Once he explained his theory, I was so intrigued by his theory. It was very different from the kinds of things we’d been looking at. … It didn’t interfere with free speech, it wasn’t even forcing a decision. What it’s saying is, ‘Here’s what the federal government will or will not sanction.’ Because, it’s the federal government’s role to grant the exclusive privilege of making money off this name."

Full article

— Chapter: Sister in Opryland 1952 from Shout, Sister, Shout!: The Untold Story of Rock-and-Roll Trailblazer Sister Rosetta Tharpe by Gayle Wald

"All three of us models are very successful in our careers, but because in the fashion industry ‘there’s only one black girl allowed’, they’ve made us compete to be that one girl. Beyoncé allowed us to show the world that we don’t have to fight against each other. She gave us the chance to see that we [black models] are far more powerful together."

 
- Chanel Iman about her breakthrough feature on the ‘Yoncé’ video with Joan Smalls and Jourdan Dunn  (via adoringbeyonce)
cherrywoodworks:

These are my extremely quick “fan” made designs for the upcoming Disney movie “Moana”.
Stop. There is a reason why “fan” is in quotations.
I am not a fan. I am full of dread. Disney is about to tackle a Polynesian princess and that terrifies me.
For one, I am so angry at all of the fanmade designs I have seen. The sexy stereotyped Polynesian designs that somehow condenses hundreds of different cultures into a tube top and a a ti-leaf skirt.
Do you have any idea how offensive that is. That would be like making Mulan and saying “Hey she’s Asian, let’s throw her in a yukata”. Do you know how offensive it is that people think that Polynesian is a singular race? Hint: Massively.
I picked four cultures out of the vastness of Polynesia and each design is clearly different from the next. Each design is 100% endemic to the culture it is from, and it’s not even the tip of the iceberg.
We are not a homogenized area of the world. We have different languages, traditions, and ways of life. We are not all the same. We are not coconut bras and grass skirts. We never needed compasses. We are celestial navigators - it hasn’t died out. We journeyed across the Pacific using the stars and waves to guide us. We perfected aquaculture and sustainable living. Our heritages are rich and varied and beautiful.
We are not a tube top and a ti-leaf skirt. We are not an indistinguishable fabric swathed on brown bodies with random flowers in our hair. Stop fetishizing us! You have the internet at your discretion, and this is the best you can come up with?
Secondly, the fact that Moana will be dealing with mythology in Polynesia makes me want to crumple up and cry. It angers me to no end that people keep playing fast and loose with things they think are obsolete. Most of us still believe in our Gods (myself included). My family has a heiau, as recent as one generation ago my family has stories of conversing with Gods. Yet, people act like it’s fair game. Last I checked if anyone made retcons to the undead carpenter millions threw a shitfit, but because we are a marginalized people our beliefs are not allowed some respect?
It makes me angry and I won’t apologize for it. It makes me angry that when I call out other minorities for falsely portraying or marginalizing my culture (and the cultures of my fellow Polynesians) I get the “well I’m a minority too so I’m excused”. That is the worst offense, when people who should know better still treat you like an obsolete toy to be bandied about as characters.
We are indigenous people and we deserve respect. We deserve for people to care about our culture. For people to be afraid that the nightmare which created whitewashed Pocahontas might happen to us. If you call yourself an ally, or self-aware, I demand that you fear for us. I beg that you question what may happen in the wake of what Disney has been spewing out. Don’t be part of the base that turns Moana into nothing more than a token.
We were too young to stop Pocahontas from being made. We are not too young to afflict a change and prevent it from happening again. Signal boost my words, or write your own. Do something. Don’t let a movie go out across the world that could damage those that have already taken heavy hits. Don’t be compliant, don’t be silent. Don’t DO that I beg you. I am begging you on my knees, I grovel to you.
Don’t condense our cultures to an easy stereotype. Don’t let our stories become distorted for entertainment. Fight for good writing, fight for good designs. Fight for a movie you would be proud to watch. Give us something more than a rebellious teen who is Polynesian simply because they say she is.
Please. Please. With all my heart, a’ohe hana nui ka alu’ia. No task is too big when done together.

cherrywoodworks:

These are my extremely quick “fan” made designs for the upcoming Disney movie “Moana”.

Stop. There is a reason why “fan” is in quotations.

I am not a fan. I am full of dread. Disney is about to tackle a Polynesian princess and that terrifies me.

For one, I am so angry at all of the fanmade designs I have seen. The sexy stereotyped Polynesian designs that somehow condenses hundreds of different cultures into a tube top and a a ti-leaf skirt.

Do you have any idea how offensive that is. That would be like making Mulan and saying “Hey she’s Asian, let’s throw her in a yukata”. Do you know how offensive it is that people think that Polynesian is a singular race? Hint: Massively.

I picked four cultures out of the vastness of Polynesia and each design is clearly different from the next. Each design is 100% endemic to the culture it is from, and it’s not even the tip of the iceberg.

We are not a homogenized area of the world. We have different languages, traditions, and ways of life. We are not all the same. We are not coconut bras and grass skirts. We never needed compasses. We are celestial navigators - it hasn’t died out. We journeyed across the Pacific using the stars and waves to guide us. We perfected aquaculture and sustainable living. Our heritages are rich and varied and beautiful.

We are not a tube top and a ti-leaf skirt. We are not an indistinguishable fabric swathed on brown bodies with random flowers in our hair. Stop fetishizing us! You have the internet at your discretion, and this is the best you can come up with?

Secondly, the fact that Moana will be dealing with mythology in Polynesia makes me want to crumple up and cry. It angers me to no end that people keep playing fast and loose with things they think are obsolete. Most of us still believe in our Gods (myself included). My family has a heiau, as recent as one generation ago my family has stories of conversing with Gods. Yet, people act like it’s fair game. Last I checked if anyone made retcons to the undead carpenter millions threw a shitfit, but because we are a marginalized people our beliefs are not allowed some respect?

It makes me angry and I won’t apologize for it. It makes me angry that when I call out other minorities for falsely portraying or marginalizing my culture (and the cultures of my fellow Polynesians) I get the “well I’m a minority too so I’m excused”. That is the worst offense, when people who should know better still treat you like an obsolete toy to be bandied about as characters.

We are indigenous people and we deserve respect. We deserve for people to care about our culture. For people to be afraid that the nightmare which created whitewashed Pocahontas might happen to us. If you call yourself an ally, or self-aware, I demand that you fear for us. I beg that you question what may happen in the wake of what Disney has been spewing out. Don’t be part of the base that turns Moana into nothing more than a token.

We were too young to stop Pocahontas from being made. We are not too young to afflict a change and prevent it from happening again. Signal boost my words, or write your own. Do something. Don’t let a movie go out across the world that could damage those that have already taken heavy hits. Don’t be compliant, don’t be silent. Don’t DO that I beg you. I am begging you on my knees, I grovel to you.

Don’t condense our cultures to an easy stereotype. Don’t let our stories become distorted for entertainment. Fight for good writing, fight for good designs. Fight for a movie you would be proud to watch. Give us something more than a rebellious teen who is Polynesian simply because they say she is.

Please. Please. With all my heart, a’ohe hana nui ka alu’ia. No task is too big when done together.

"But the bigger trauma is Macklemore’s continual conflation of homophobia with Hip Hop and ultimately Blackness and Black people. Consider the beginning of the second verse of “Same Love”: If I was gay, I would think hip-hop hates me/ have you read the YouTube comments lately?”

Hip-hop has been queer for years before Macklemore was even born. The first rap song came out of the disco tradition, rappers like Cee-Lo Green and Andre 3000 have been doing drag for years, Common came out against writing homophobic lyrics, not to mention the countless rappers and artists who have supported Frank Ocean. While homophobic lyrics are pervasive in Hip Hop, they have never been more homophobic or heteronormative than any rock or pop song. Secondly, if 87 percent of YouTube users are White and 54 percent male, it’s guys who look like you and listen to rap like you do, who perpetuate that narrative of hateful Hip Hop? He goes on to speak about how “we” are complacent to homophobia: “We become so numb to what we’re saying/ A culture founded from oppression/ yet we don’t have acceptance for ‘em.”

The most accurate statement in this stanza is that Hip Hop is a culture founded on oppression, but whose? Not Macklemore — Hip Hop was not grown, marketed and exploited on the backs of handsome, straight, white men."

 

Othello is a play about internalized racism, goddammit. 

barbotrobot:

It’s not exactly a novel observation I’m making, there, but it’s definitely one I think more people should understand about the play. It’s a large part of why it’s my favorite Shakespeare piece.

Othello has been presented to me in more than one class as a play about the nature of evil and lies, and about the dangers of jealousy. But to me, it’s always been a play about the way a society teaches people to hate themselves.

Read More

NBC's The Sound of Music 

medievalpoc:

I think you’ll find some objections to NBC’s The Sound of Music having some dishearteningly familiar (incorrect) rationales.

Ooooh, wow. This article is a great takedown and packed with facts!!! [racism, slurs]:

Earlier this month, veteran stage actress Audra McDonald gifted audiences with yet another sublime performance in NBC’s live remake of The Sound of Music.

image

While the overall production received mixed reviews, critics across the country heralded McDonald’s portrayal of Mother Abbess and her soul-stirring rendition of “Climb E’vry Mountain” as the television week’s top highlight, with Time calling her “the show-stealer of the night.”

Despite such acclaim, McDonald’s portrayal of the majestic Mother Abbess was not without its detractors. But negative reviewers had nothing unflattering to say about the five-time Tony Award winner’s acting or vocal abilities—instead, their opposition was chiefly rooted in the portrayal of the often-overlooked Mother Abbess as a black woman.

“We turned it off after we saw a negro nun,” tweeted dave44s. “No negro species in the Sound of Music.” (Note: dave44s’s sentiment was retweeted over 200 times before his Twitter account was suspended.) Mike Greenberg of the ESPN sports talk show Mike and Mike also objected to the new production, arguing that it should not be performed. “They don’t rewrite history books,” he fumed.

Despite spewing such vitriol, detractors maintained that their opposition to McDonald’s Mother Abbess was not driven by racial bigotry but instead by a desire for “accurate” history. One commenter, Will506, went so far as to write, 

“Audra McDonald did not belong in the Sound of Music as a black abbess in the Austria of 1938. It is a factual impossibility and respectful negative reaction to that represents not hate speech but a comment on 2013 political correctness run amok.”

Really?

One can easily point to the existence of the Sudan-born St. Josephine Bakhita, who was stationed at an Italian convent less than 200 miles from the Austrian border in 1938, to begin to refute such a claim. But the confidence with which detractors rejected the historical possibility of black nun in the Austria of 1938, along with the fact that the claim went unchallenged, even by McDonald’s staunchest supporters, demands further attention.

To say that there could not have been a black nun in a European convent in the modern era not only demonstrates a profound ignorance of the long and rich history of black Catholic nuns in the Atlantic world, but also reflects the egregious limitations of the white American racial imagination, which has for centuries equated blackness with moral debasement and vehemently denied the existence of “a virtuous black woman.”

Despite the Catholic Church’s long (and painful) history of racial exclusion and segregation in its religious ranks, thousands of black women have dared to profess the sacred vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience in the Atlantic World. In doing so, they provided a powerful refutation to whites who characterized Africa-descended people as sub-human and used the ideology of white supremacy and racist manipulations of the Bible to justify African enslavement and racial segregation.

Although the overwhelming majority of the world’s black Catholic sisters served (and continue to serve) in the Americas and Africa, the presence of black nuns in European convents is not a recent phenomenon. In fact, one of the first documented black nuns in Europe was Louise Marie-Therese, the famed Black Nun of Moret, who took the religious habit in 1695 and remained at Benedictine abbey at Moret-sur-Loing in France until her death in 1732.

Kidnapped off the coast of present-day Ghana and sold into Spanish slavery as a child around 1686, Venerable Teresa Chikaba entered the Convent Dominican Sisters of Saint Mary Magdalene in Salamanca, Spain in 1703 and professed her vows as Therese Juliana of Saint Dominic in 1704. Generally regarded as the first black nun in a Spanish cloister, Chikabaremained in the convent until her death in 1748. She is currently under consideration for sainthood.

In the nineteenth century, several American-born women of African descent also became nuns in Europe. Barred from becoming fully-professed sisters in white and indigenous congregations in the Americas because of their race, these black women crossed the Atlantic Ocean to embrace the religious state. While the majority of these women were extremely-light skinned and could pass for white, at least three dark-skinned, U.S.-born black women of slave heritage entered European congregations in the nineteenth century. Fredericka Law of Savannah, Georgia, for example, received the habit of Missionary Franciscan Sisters of the Immaculate Conception at the Shrine of Portiuncula in Assisi, Italy in 1882. She took the religious name of Sister Benedict of the Angels and professed her perpetual vows on her deathbed one year later. She is buried in Rome.

Europe’s most famous black nun is undoubtedly St. Josephine Bakhita, who spent twelve years as a slave in Sudan and Italy before her emancipation in 1889. She entered the novitiate at the Institute of the Catecumenate in Venice, Italy in 1893 and professed her vows as a Canosian Sister on December 8, 1896. Affectionately called Mother Moretta, or “our Black Mother,” St. Josephine Bakhita persevered in religious life through the rise and fall of the Third Reich until her death in 1947. She was canonized by the Catholic Church in 2000.

Although there is no known documentation of black Abbess in Austria in 1938, she certainly could have existed. Indeed, if St. Josephine Bakhita could exist as a black nun in a white congregation in Mussolini’s Italy, imagining a black nun in a white congregation in nearby Austria is not that far-fetched. Moreover, if hundreds of free and enslaved black nuns could exist in the brutal slave societies of the Americas, surely the decision to portray Mother Abbess as a black woman in a 2013 production of The Sound of Music should not rack the mind.

*jumps up and down, cheering*

noiseymusic:

The Pop Diaspora of M.I.A
One of the most entertaining and frustrating things about being a fan of M.I.A has been watching white critics struggle to articulate her style while challenging her right to the aesthetic she cultivates. Artists of color aren’t often recognized for their sophistication or intent. Rather, they’re ascribed a “primitive rawness.”
With her synthesis of diverse but connected motifs M.I.A gets dubbed “cut and paste.” Words like “patchwork,” “slapped-together,” and “scotch tape” are regularly used, and that’s from positive reviews. American critics, unsure of the cacophony of identities and experiences M.I.A offers, commonly project their own uncertainties onto her.
The reception of her albums can be charted along her public perception, which took a hit in 2010. Her increasing success hadn’t changed the tone of her antiestablishment politics and the juxtaposition made scoffing at M.I.A as fashionable as dancing to Galang had been.
Continue

noiseymusic:

The Pop Diaspora of M.I.A

One of the most entertaining and frustrating things about being a fan of M.I.A has been watching white critics struggle to articulate her style while challenging her right to the aesthetic she cultivates. Artists of color aren’t often recognized for their sophistication or intent. Rather, they’re ascribed a “primitive rawness.”

With her synthesis of diverse but connected motifs M.I.A gets dubbed “cut and paste.” Words like “patchwork,” “slapped-together,” and “scotch tape” are regularly used, and that’s from positive reviews. American critics, unsure of the cacophony of identities and experiences M.I.A offers, commonly project their own uncertainties onto her.

The reception of her albums can be charted along her public perception, which took a hit in 2010. Her increasing success hadn’t changed the tone of her antiestablishment politics and the juxtaposition made scoffing at M.I.A as fashionable as dancing to Galang had been.

Continue

"I do not know how much my mother spent on her camel colored cape or knee-high boots but I know that whatever she paid it returned in hard-to-measure dividends. How do you put a price on the double-take of a clerk at the welfare office who decides you might not be like those other trifling women in the waiting room and provides an extra bit of information about completing a form that you would not have known to ask about? What is the retail value of a school principal who defers a bit more to your child because your mother’s presentation of self signals that she might unleash the bureaucratic savvy of middle class parents to advocate for her child? I don’t know the price of these critical engagements with organizations and gatekeepers relative to our poverty when I was growing up. But, I am living proof of its investment yield."

 
-

The Logic of Stupid Poor People

A great article about the backlash against those POC who were racially profiled at Barney’s for “spending money on items they can’t afford”

(via newwavefeminism)

p5stuck:

Laquisha originates in ‘Lakeisha’, a Swahili name meaning ‘favourite’. The popularity of Laquisha originates in the French influence on black people in America, where the ‘La-’ naming prefix became popularized among freed black slaves. 
So how do you spend enough years on this planet to think African names are a bad idea to give to a child, but never consider why?

p5stuck:

Laquisha originates in ‘Lakeisha’, a Swahili name meaning ‘favourite’. The popularity of Laquisha originates in the French influence on black people in America, where the ‘La-’ naming prefix became popularized among freed black slaves. 

So how do you spend enough years on this planet to think African names are a bad idea to give to a child, but never consider why?

cumaeansibyl:

bapgeek:

osechieveryday:

These guys are charging people $20 to view Banksy’s latest piece in East New York, Brooklyn.
The piece is part of Banksy’s “Better Out Than In” project, wherein he creates a work in a different NYC location daily, then Instagrams the general area of the work.
Banksy is British artist who keeps his real name and appearance secret. His works sell for hundreds of thousands of dollars, and two have sold for well over one million each.
East New York is a predominantly black and Latin@ neighborhood in Brooklyn. According to Wikipedia, it also has the highest crime rate in New York City, and over half of its residents experience poverty.
According to reports, white people are currently flocking into East New York to look at Banksy’s piece. A few tried to chisel it out of the wall, and claimed to have called a contractor to remove it when their attempts failed. Since then, a group of neighborhood residents have taken charge of the site.
Gawker writes: “These men, heroes that they are, have elevated the original work, turning it into a performance piece about the commodification and hipster-fication of people’s homes. If you’re going to treat a neighborhood like an art museum, why shouldn’t the residents of that neighborhood charge admission like an art museum, particularly when many New Yorkers would never come to that patch of the city but to take a picture of a stencil painting of a beaver?”
http://gawker.com/these-men-are-now-charging-people-to-look-at-banksys-l-1443562694
http://m.animalnewyork.com/2013/banksyny-10-a-beaver-in-east-new-york/
http://arrestedmotion.com/2011/09/banksy-top-25-most-expensive-works-ever/
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_New_York,_Brooklyn

I ain’t evn mad.

Mad? I’m proud as hell. Making money off some foreign dude coming in and messing up your neighborhood when if you did the same thing you’d be arrested for vandalism and vilified as “thugs” by the same white people lining up to see this? That’s some fucking badass entrepreneurship. I hope they make enough money to start their own business because these guys should be going places.

cumaeansibyl:

bapgeek:

osechieveryday:

These guys are charging people $20 to view Banksy’s latest piece in East New York, Brooklyn.

The piece is part of Banksy’s “Better Out Than In” project, wherein he creates a work in a different NYC location daily, then Instagrams the general area of the work.

Banksy is British artist who keeps his real name and appearance secret. His works sell for hundreds of thousands of dollars, and two have sold for well over one million each.

East New York is a predominantly black and Latin@ neighborhood in Brooklyn. According to Wikipedia, it also has the highest crime rate in New York City, and over half of its residents experience poverty.

According to reports, white people are currently flocking into East New York to look at Banksy’s piece. A few tried to chisel it out of the wall, and claimed to have called a contractor to remove it when their attempts failed. Since then, a group of neighborhood residents have taken charge of the site.

Gawker writes: “These men, heroes that they are, have elevated the original work, turning it into a performance piece about the commodification and hipster-fication of people’s homes. If you’re going to treat a neighborhood like an art museum, why shouldn’t the residents of that neighborhood charge admission like an art museum, particularly when many New Yorkers would never come to that patch of the city but to take a picture of a stencil painting of a beaver?”

http://gawker.com/these-men-are-now-charging-people-to-look-at-banksys-l-1443562694

http://m.animalnewyork.com/2013/banksyny-10-a-beaver-in-east-new-york/

http://arrestedmotion.com/2011/09/banksy-top-25-most-expensive-works-ever/

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_New_York,_Brooklyn

I ain’t evn mad.

Mad? I’m proud as hell. Making money off some foreign dude coming in and messing up your neighborhood when if you did the same thing you’d be arrested for vandalism and vilified as “thugs” by the same white people lining up to see this? That’s some fucking badass entrepreneurship. I hope they make enough money to start their own business because these guys should be going places.

brothasoul:

esc0:

siddharthasmama:

brashblacknonbeliever:

modernmonkeys:

Ayesha A. Siddiqi

Here’s the storify of all her tweets on the topic. I suggest everyone go read it.

This is the most Kanye related stuff I’ve ever had on my blog, but it’s because regardless if I listen to him as an artist, everything he’s saying and is about is entirely real and important.

whyohwhykai: ""urban" is white code for "ratchet, ghetto, making fun of black ppl" so yeah i would just do something that's not that for that day."

yeeeeeeeah that’s what i figured

i think i may take it intentionally literally and dress up as like my favorite city or something?

leanin:

What would have once sounded like a far-fetched feminist fantasy – women forming the majority of a parliament – is a reality in one country in the world, Rwanda.
In fact, women are making gains throughout all of Africa, but these achievements have been met with a loud silence from the western feminist movement. 
African women are blazing a feminist trail - why don’t we hear their voices? (The Guardian) 

leanin:

What would have once sounded like a far-fetched feminist fantasy – women forming the majority of a parliament – is a reality in one country in the world, Rwanda.

In fact, women are making gains throughout all of Africa, but these achievements have been met with a loud silence from the western feminist movement. 

African women are blazing a feminist trail - why don’t we hear their voices? (The Guardian)