© everlark

caterinasforzas:

A most beloved sister…

nomenal:

Congrats on Winning Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress Lupita Nyong’o!

“I love that she’s unapologetically badass. There’s no back-story trying to explain something horrible that happened to her that explains who she is. No, that’s just who she is. She just is this person; no explanation needed. Just like men—when a male character comes on screen and is a badass, you just accept it. And I’m hoping that’s what fans do with Rosa. She is who she is and she just doesn’t give a shit.”- Stephanie Beatriz on her character, Rosa Diaz, in Brooklyn Nine-Nine

#gay

I started writing in college. I had a great playwriting teacher who said ‘you should write’. It almost hadn’t occurred to me that that was something I could do. I was a theater fanatic when I was in high school and –– Wendy Wasserstein? Caryl Churchill? I could count on one hand the women I knew who wrote plays. Every great American playwright was a man. And so I just sort of were like, ‘they’re men, they’re probably smarter than me, I can’t do it’. And then someone was like ‘Why did you ever think that? You can totally do it.’ But I think if you don’t have examples, it’s very hard to imagine yourself doing it.

[ Greta Gerwig on the importance of women as screenwriters | x ]

bellamyyoung:

Neon Jungle - Trouble

I chased a man across the seven seas. The pursuit cost me my crew, my commission, and my life.

…having Hamlet and the Ghost communicating in sign language—one might describe it almost as their “private” language—also served to produce the (in my experience, unique) effect of putting the father-and-son pair in a sort of psycho-spiritual bubble, contra mundum; a bubble that excluded all others and highlighted Hamlet’s isolation. The relationship between father and son portrayed in most productions comes across as distant, severe and (on Hamlet’s part) rather worshipful, even awestruck. In this production the father/son relationship is portrayed as having been loving and paternally intimate, which makes Hamlet’s reaction to his father’s tale of murder all the more harrowing. [x] [x]

stardust-rain:

based on: (x) (x) source: (x)

So, Elementary fandom has talked about gaslighting before, and how it is used in abusive relationships. We’ve seen Irene/Moriarty do this to Sherlock in Elementary, and the same pattern appears in the newly-aired Sherlock with Sherlock and John. This article defines how gaslighting takes several distinct forms most of which can been seen paralleled with Elementary and BBC Sherlock. (Also, if anyone with psychiatric background could weigh in on this, that’d be great.)

1-4: Compartmentalising: Irene fakes her own death, then makes a sudden reappearance a year later, after Sherlock has moved on and formed healthy relationships with other people (Elementary).

Sherlock fakes his own death, makes a sudden reappearance two years later after John has moved on and formed healthy relationships with people (BBC)

5&6 - Denial, Blaming/Deflection, Chronic Invalidation: Sherlock deduces that Irene is working for Moriarty (or at least, not held captive by him as she stated) and thinks she’s lying to him - he gets angry. Irene placates him, saying it’s because he is “seeing things that aren’t there”. (Elementary)

John’s angry at Sherlock for not contacting him for the last two years; Sherlock doesn’t apologise and dismisses John’s anger, explaining that it was because Sherlock didn’t trust him. (BBC)

7&8 Domination: Irene tries to make Sherlock take back his words - when he doesn’t, she replies with “You lied before! You don’t want to come with me, so you’re inventing an excuse not to!”. Then she walks out of Sherlock’s life and makes him think he’s cause of it because in her eyes, he is the just as bad as Moriarty. (Elementary)

John’s angry that Sherlock acts irresponsibly and the bomb is about to go off. Sherlock defuses the bomb in the tube train, but lets John believe that they’re both going to die. Sherlock fakes vulnerability, apologises to John and uses the now-or-never-scenario to make John accept his apology. (BBC)

9&10 Minimalisation: Irene waltzes back into Sherlock’s life, reveals her true identity, and calls Sherlock’s trauma at her death a game. “You’re a game I’ll win every time.” (Elementary)

Sherlock reveals that the bomb had an off switch, and laughs at John’s trauma and fear when he thinks he’s about to die. “Your face, your face! Totally had you!” (BBC)

The most important thing about this, though, is that Elementary portrays it as an abusive relationship and recognises that Moriarty/Sherlock is not in any way a healthy relationship. Meanwhile BBC Sherlock does the complete opposite, which is all kinds of fucked up.

I’m going to get hate for this

streussal:

Yeah, well, I worry more about scientists than science.

#SARAH MANNING #knows the system #sarah manning has been kicked around by people in power #sarah manning knows to be suspicious of all that shit #religion and science — what does it matter if it’s all a bunch of sexist white dues trying to control the #lives and bodies of everyone else? #she has such a good read about who to trust and who to protect #it breaks my heart #she tries to be out for herself and her people #but she keeps expanding her idea of what her circle of ‘her people’ constitutes #because she’s got such a good heart #oh i love sarah so much (via mswyrr)

#*rolls around in tags* #i love that our protagonist is explicitly from a working class/low income background #instead of one of her middle or upper-class status fellow clones #that she was raised by a woman who is suspicious of the police and this is treated as REASONABLE #the default position of the show is automatically to be wary of those in positions of power #her and Felix have always been aware of this