© everlark

silentpunk:

yoursecretary:

bah ha ha ha ha

“misguided sexual rage” haha

silentpunk:

yoursecretary:

bah ha ha ha ha

“misguided sexual rage” haha

jethroq: "FYI, I'm a high kinsey bisexual man (in an homosexual relationship), and I enjoy bromance jokes. I know I'm just one guy, and I'm not thinking about the identitypolitical implications about each and every thing on screen, but I just like seeing pairings like that."

No that is totally fine!  Not that you need my validation.  But sorry, I didn’t mean to imply that people who enjoy bromances are ~awful or anything like that.  

Bromances aren’t even inherently bad.  It’s just that (imo) when they are by far the dominant type of male relationship portrayed in media (therefore at the expense of straightforward male friendships or already marginalized male romantic / sexual relationships), then we have a problem.

Basically what I would like from media and fandom is:  

 

  1. normalization of close friendships between men
  2. normalization of romantic relationships between men
  3. and for #1 not to constantly eclipse #2 
  4. (also a lot of other things but this is a neat little post with a neat little theme so I will shut it now)

"Colonel Brandon is an exceptional man isn’t he? What sadness he has known. He kept faithful to his first love even after she had been torn away from him. Even after she was dead. He is the true romantic I think. It is not what we say or feel that makes us what we are. It is what we do. Or fail to do." 

oliviastclair:

Hi yes, I love Colonel Christopher Brandon. I don’t care if he’s too ‘old’ and fictional. 

I need this quote on my page because YES.

foreheadtittaes:

#DADDY ISSUES INC. 

I would marry Faramir if he were real.  And asked.  And knew how to bathe daily.
[Image description: a series of images of Faramir from Lord of the Rings: Return of the King]

foreheadtittaes:

#DADDY ISSUES INC. 

I would marry Faramir if he were real.  And asked.  And knew how to bathe daily.

[Image description: a series of images of Faramir from Lord of the Rings: Return of the King]

"Feminism expects a man to be ethical, emotionally present, and accountable to his values in his actions with women — as well as with other men. Feminism loves men enough to expect them to act more honorably and actually believes them capable of doing so."

 
- Guyland, Michael Kimmel
superhumangirl:

reelaroundthefountain:

pollutedessence:

So I get the point, but really…Shut up and quit complaining. Go live overseas.

I hear this from time to time, and it always bothers me.  On the one hand, I understand that an assembly-line type of life is a very real and depressing thing to a lot of people.  On the other hand, I feel to some extent that it’s over-dramatized.  I mean, if you don’t want to have kids, then don’t have kids.  If you don’t want to get married, then don’t get married.  If you want to do art instead of work in an office then do art on the side or quit your job or don’t take the job in the first place.  There’s no one forcing you to live a self-oppressed life.
And that is where I catch myself, because I realize I’m totally assuming that everyone has the privileges I have.  Which is completely untrue.  Not everyone gets to go to college, not everyone can afford the risk of a vocation they love but doesn’t pay well.  So there is a kind of institutionalized path that many people have to follow because they are poor, or don’t have access to good education, or don’t know what they do want but do know what they don’t want.  And that’s really sad and unfair.
But at the same time, the imagery above bothers me because I feel like it’s attacking the people (like me) who do want to get married and have kids and watch TV (and read books) and obey the law and have a nice retirement and maybe, if I’m lucky, eventually get a driver’s license.  Okay, so it’s not a life full of adrenaline, but it’s not a life that necessarily excludes travel or art or curiosity, and it certainly doesn’t exclude love or happiness.  And I don’t like being told that those dreams are limited or stupid or make me less free than I feel I am, or less full of possibility than I feel I am.
So, this has been inconclusive.  There you go.

Hey! Wait, I agree. I have been thinking a lot about how some of the things that I want are what people could call “conforming” things. 
I would not mind marrying a guy who wears brown belts and a sweater vest with dorky glasses. We could raise kids and be happy. We would have jobs that we liked, hopefully loved, and our lives would have adventure, but you don’t have to go completely off the charts. That’s part of what bothered me about Into The Wild, even though I loved it. You don’t have to go to extremes to find happiness. 
That said, I do think that there is a lot wrong with the “track” that we are all supposed to be on. You can choose to be an artist, but can you really? It’s hard to think outside of what you are accustomed to. It’s hard to really ask for what you want and not to do what people expect you to do, because you begin to expect these things from yourself as well. It’s hard to make your own way, but you can do it. And to make your own way doesn’t mean that you have to drop out of high school and live from train to train. It just means that you find what works for you, whatever that may be. 
And that is difficult. 
Here is my unedited opinion. RAW. 

"a guy who wears brown belts and a sweater vest with dorky glasses"
YES PLEASE
</missing the point>

superhumangirl:

reelaroundthefountain:

pollutedessence:

So I get the point, but really…
Shut up and quit complaining. Go live overseas.

I hear this from time to time, and it always bothers me.  On the one hand, I understand that an assembly-line type of life is a very real and depressing thing to a lot of people.  On the other hand, I feel to some extent that it’s over-dramatized.  I mean, if you don’t want to have kids, then don’t have kids.  If you don’t want to get married, then don’t get married.  If you want to do art instead of work in an office then do art on the side or quit your job or don’t take the job in the first place.  There’s no one forcing you to live a self-oppressed life.

And that is where I catch myself, because I realize I’m totally assuming that everyone has the privileges I have.  Which is completely untrue.  Not everyone gets to go to college, not everyone can afford the risk of a vocation they love but doesn’t pay well.  So there is a kind of institutionalized path that many people have to follow because they are poor, or don’t have access to good education, or don’t know what they do want but do know what they don’t want.  And that’s really sad and unfair.

But at the same time, the imagery above bothers me because I feel like it’s attacking the people (like me) who do want to get married and have kids and watch TV (and read books) and obey the law and have a nice retirement and maybe, if I’m lucky, eventually get a driver’s license.  Okay, so it’s not a life full of adrenaline, but it’s not a life that necessarily excludes travel or art or curiosity, and it certainly doesn’t exclude love or happiness.  And I don’t like being told that those dreams are limited or stupid or make me less free than I feel I am, or less full of possibility than I feel I am.

So, this has been inconclusive.  There you go.

Hey! Wait, I agree. I have been thinking a lot about how some of the things that I want are what people could call “conforming” things. 

I would not mind marrying a guy who wears brown belts and a sweater vest with dorky glasses. We could raise kids and be happy. We would have jobs that we liked, hopefully loved, and our lives would have adventure, but you don’t have to go completely off the charts. That’s part of what bothered me about Into The Wild, even though I loved it. You don’t have to go to extremes to find happiness. 

That said, I do think that there is a lot wrong with the “track” that we are all supposed to be on. You can choose to be an artist, but can you really? It’s hard to think outside of what you are accustomed to. It’s hard to really ask for what you want and not to do what people expect you to do, because you begin to expect these things from yourself as well. It’s hard to make your own way, but you can do it. And to make your own way doesn’t mean that you have to drop out of high school and live from train to train. It just means that you find what works for you, whatever that may be. 

And that is difficult. 

Here is my unedited opinion. RAW. 

"a guy who wears brown belts and a sweater vest with dorky glasses"

YES PLEASE

</missing the point>