© everlark

aquaticwonder:

Looks can kill

aquaticwonder:

Looks can kill

"If I am to be witch, then so be it, I said. And I took to eating black things — huitlacoche, the corn mushroom, coffee, dark chiles, the bruised part of fruit, the darkest, blackest things to make me hard and strong."

 
- Sandra Cisneros, from “Eyes of Zapata,” Woman Hollering Creek  (via nanjou)
iowanaturalhistory:

#TBT: Student in anatomical modeling class, c. 1945

iowanaturalhistory:

#TBT: Student in anatomical modeling class, c. 1945

Solange Knowles photographed by Casper Sejersen

sandyfarquhar:

cussingskull:

skvaderkadaver:

Collaboration work between painter Leonora Carrington & Alexandro Jodorowsky in Mexico, 1957.

"During a party, Luis Buñuel, seduced by Carrington’s beauty and emboldened by the notion that she had transcended all bourgeois morality, proposed (with his characteristic bluntness) that she become his mistress. Without even waiting for her answer, he gave her the key to the secret studio that he used as a love nest and told her to meet him at three o’clock the next afternoon. Early the next morning, Leonora went to visit the place alone. She found it tasteless: It looked exactly like a motel room. Taking advantage of the fact that she was in her menstrual period, she covered her hands with blood and used them to make bloody handprints all over the walls in order to provide a bit of decoration for that anonymous, impersonal room. Buñuel never spoke to her again.”
- Alejandro Jodorowsky,  The Spiritual Journey of Alejandro Jodorowsky: The Creator of El Topo 

buñuel never speaking to a woman again because she out buñuel’d buñuel is so buñuel, what an ass, got to look more into ms carrington—is she any relation to dora?

sandyfarquhar:

cussingskull:

skvaderkadaver:

Collaboration work between painter Leonora Carrington & Alexandro Jodorowsky in Mexico, 1957.

"During a party, Luis Buñuel, seduced by Carrington’s beauty and emboldened by the notion that she had transcended all bourgeois morality, proposed (with his characteristic bluntness) that she become his mistress. Without even waiting for her answer, he gave her the key to the secret studio that he used as a love nest and told her to meet him at three o’clock the next afternoon. Early the next morning, Leonora went to visit the place alone. She found it tasteless: It looked exactly like a motel room. Taking advantage of the fact that she was in her menstrual period, she covered her hands with blood and used them to make bloody handprints all over the walls in order to provide a bit of decoration for that anonymous, impersonal room. Buñuel never spoke to her again.”

- Alejandro Jodorowsky, The Spiritual Journey of Alejandro Jodorowsky: The Creator of El Topo

buñuel never speaking to a woman again because she out buñuel’d buñuel is so buñuel, what an ass, got to look more into ms carrington—is she any relation to dora?

liberal feminists who go on and on about protecting teenage girls which is super important, but like, when do they ever say anything about the abuse and neglect and demonization and homelessness of teenage trans girls? i see ya 

"

Her 12-year-old cried when he told her what had happened and asked if he was stopped because he was black.

"Probably, yeah," she said.

"I just want to know, how long will this last?" he asked her.

That’s when she started to cry.

"For the rest of your life," she said.

"

 
- Black Moms Tell White Moms About the Race Talk, in light of the shooting of an unarmed black teenager in Ferguson, The Ethics Project invited black mothers to explain the heartbreaking reality of raising a black son in America.  (via starksandrecreation)

Rosamund Pike photographed by Nadav Kander

queermobile:

amorphe:

 
heracliteanfire:

‘Phengodidae Sp. The beetle family Phengodidae is known also as glowworm beetles, whose larvae are known as glowworms.’ (via Project Noah)


who did her hair like this

queermobile:

amorphe:

 

heracliteanfire:

‘Phengodidae Sp. The beetle family Phengodidae is known also as glowworm beetles, whose larvae are known as glowworms.’ (via Project Noah)

who did her hair like this

littlesati:

"We need scary women characters. Men hit women, cheat on women and frankly they are mouthier than ever nowadays. ‘Calm down’, ‘settle down’, ‘listen you bitch’ etc. They think if they hit their wives they will become submissive and afraid. Worse yet - they think that women SHOULD be afraid of men and should be submissive. They think it’s in woman’s nature to be submissive and fragile. And thanks to Gillian Flynn they can now see that sometimes woman’s nature is to be vindictive, righteous and very, very sly. There is nothing misogynistic in saying some women are evil. It would be misogynistic to say they are weak. And neither of the female characters in Gone Girl is weak."

- Cinematic Corner’s On audience’s misogyny, Amy Dunne, the Cool Girl myth and the brilliance of Gillian Flynn (x)


Jenny Holzer, My arrogance knows no bounds and I will make no peace today, and you should be so lucky to find a woman like me 

Jenny Holzer, My arrogance knows no bounds and I will make no peace today, and you should be so lucky to find a woman like me 

pyrrhics:

bad af iridescent greeen sequin dress

"

People who write about gender politics have wildly differing opinions on Amy: some see her as a blisteringly alive, sickly fascinating character who’s both a monstrous manipulator and a brilliant commentator, particularly on gender politics in relationships. Others see her as, by the end, a cartoon, living down to every silly idea about women as naturally devious shrews who arrange pregnancies to get their own way and pretend they have been abused when they have not.

What has always kept Amy from troubling me in this particular sense is that she does the things she does not because they are in her nature as a woman, but because they are in her nature as a psychopath. One of the problems with the relative paucity of interesting female characters is that they become responsible for representing all women, for speaking to What Women Are Like. The more scantly represented any demographic group is, the more each person seems to reflect upon everyone. But here, it has always been perfectly clear that Amy is an aberration. She is a woman, but she is not only a woman. She is also a monster, and the second half of Fincher’s film is, in many ways, a horror movie about the great difficulty — and eventually the impossibility — of defeating her. She is the rare monster in a monster movie who wins at the end. Whatever she has to do, however offensive, however distasteful, however horrifying. Whatever.

It is in Amy’s specific, defined character that she will do anything. She is that smart, that angry, and that unfettered by conscience. It would not be realistic to suggest that she, given the person she is made out to be, would not do these things, would not think of these things. It is not her lack of conscience or her ruthlessness that is gendered; it is the way she expresses those things as a result of her very much gendered life. Amy’s pathology plays out in the fields of marriage and childbirth because that is where she sees herself having a chance to attain power. That’s where the high stakes are, and a person as angry and intelligent as Amy knows how to locate the highest possible stakes.

"

 
-

NPR Review on Gone Girl (via connietough)

ETA commentary from belinsky

YES THIS THANKSand i think what people miss too—possibly because many of the people reviewing this are men— is that nick; too; is monstrous?we watch amy feel trapped and controlled in the boxes society has given her and at the same time we watch nick CLOSE THOSE BOXES AROUND HER and lose it when she tries to climb outhe’s a ‘good husband’ in much the same way walt white is a ‘good father’ (though to a less extreme degree)— he thinks that as long as he does what is expected of him as a husband amy should not only accept it but be grateful for itand the fact that she withers playing this role for him and that she exists outside of that role INFURIATES himhe expects things from the world— from her— (and from go and andy; people seem to miss this somehow— nick dunne is a straight up misogynist even if the woman he mostly harms is a psychopath who ‘deserves it’ (blech) )when nick finds out what amy’s done his first instinct is to KILL here’come home you cunt so i can kill you’amy for all her psychosis only ever kills her rapist (and WOW THE NUMBER OF REVIEWERS WHO THINK THAT SHE CONSENTS TO THAT RELATIONSHIP)amy wants to destroy nick sure but nick’s first reaction is instinctive destructionbecause he can no longer control her in her boxamy is psychotic beyond reproach but NICK IS ALSO MISOGYNISTIC BEYOND REPROACH and people miss that a LOTit is an equal battle of horrible in which one can only get on the level with the other by being full-on insane because THAT’S HOW MUCH PRIVILEGE AND CONTROL HE WIELDS OVER HERshe’s always been a psycho but he creates her in his imageand that image is ‘perfect couple’so amy takes that perfect couple and shoves it up his ass like a hot pokerit’s certainly not the nicest way she could have gone about it but this is in the end a revenge novelit’s the revenge of pretty little wivesit’s the housewife as golemamy is not ‘the villain’she’s just more extremeand so she wins

catherineaddington:

I had kind of a nerd-out this morning. But I felt like everyone needed to know about this.

sylvides:

bunfoot:

these looks are so rulers of the galaxy kanye looks like he has a scepter in the 4th pic

KANYE IS THE SUN KING THAT OUR TIME DESERVES.