© everlark

michaelaaronmcallister:

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

Quilt/7 Inches x 7.5 Inches/2014

astrodidact:

This Tree Is Growing 40 Different Kinds Of Fruit At Once
This single (and quite colorfully blossoming) tree grows 40 different varieties of peaches, plums, apricots, nectarines, cherries, and even almonds — but just how does it do it?
It does it through the process of chip grafting. After sculptor Sam Van Aken bought a failing orchard in upstate New York full of hundreds of different fruit trees, he began the pain-staking process of grafting several of the different varieties together into one tree. Six years later, the result is this 40-fruit bearing tree, which includes some heirloom varieties that are centuries old.
Image: Sam Van Aken
http://io9.com/this-tree-is-growing-40-different-kinds-of-fruit-at-onc-1608917128

astrodidact:

This Tree Is Growing 40 Different Kinds Of Fruit At Once

This single (and quite colorfully blossoming) tree grows 40 different varieties of peaches, plums, apricots, nectarines, cherries, and even almonds — but just how does it do it?

It does it through the process of chip grafting. After sculptor Sam Van Aken bought a failing orchard in upstate New York full of hundreds of different fruit trees, he began the pain-staking process of grafting several of the different varieties together into one tree. Six years later, the result is this 40-fruit bearing tree, which includes some heirloom varieties that are centuries old.

Image: Sam Van Aken

http://io9.com/this-tree-is-growing-40-different-kinds-of-fruit-at-onc-1608917128

raboartcollection:

The title of the work is identical to a series of photographs by Huseyin shot in Odessa, showing curtains blowing in the wind. These images inspired an installation of hardened lace curtains, frozen in time and space. The work refers to the gesture of opening the windows to set free the soul of the deceased, as well as the idea of a spirit present in a room, mysteriously lifting the curtains to reveal its presence.
Gabriel Lester,Melancholia in Arcadia (2011)
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. Rabo Art Collection

raboartcollection:

The title of the work is identical to a series of photographs by Huseyin shot in Odessa, showing curtains blowing in the wind. These images inspired an installation of hardened lace curtains, frozen in time and space. The work refers to the gesture of opening the windows to set free the soul of the deceased, as well as the idea of a spirit present in a room, mysteriously lifting the curtains to reveal its presence.

Gabriel Lester,Melancholia in Arcadia (2011)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection

tsabe:

The Animated Self Portrait 

T.S Abe

thenearsightedmonkey:

Dear DrawBridge Students,

I believe we are going to have a very very good semester.

Sincerely,

Professor Bootsy

Above: “Beatrice Addressing Dante” circa 1824 by William Blake; painter, poet, print-maker; London, England 

Below: “And Everything is Back to Normal” 2012 by Andy,  2nd Grader, Franklin Elementary school; Madison, Wisconsin

kleinecharlotte:

Art History Meme [1/8] Artists
↳ Gustav Klimt

cooperhewitt:

image

Mariska Karasz, ”Victoriana”, 1945–47, wool technique: embroidered in herring-bone, feather, stem, chain, detached looping satin, roumanian, looping, couching and honeycomb filling stitches on plain weave foundation. 1977-45-1

See more stuff from the Textiles department.

passivus:

Guy Billout

passivus:

Guy Billout

motleycraft-o-rama:

By Cerulean Sarah, on Ravelry.

motleycraft-o-rama:

By Cerulean Sarah, on Ravelry.

cooperhewitt:

image

Embroidered Picture, 1948, stem, long and short, satin and couching stitches on warp-faced plain weave. 1971-50-190

See more stuff from the Textiles department.

Gallenga 

cooperhewitt:

1992-155-3

In the early twentieth century, Italian painter and textile designer Maria Monaci Gallenga achieved international fame for her extraordinary costume and textile designs. Born into a family of prominent intellectuals and educated in literature and painting, Gallenga became fascinated with the artworks of ancient, medieval and Renaissance Italy as a teenager. In the nineteen-teens, she began to re-envision historic textile patterns and clothing styles as simple yet elegant fabrics and garments that suited modern tastes and lifestyles.

In collaboration with her husband, a professor at the University of Rome, Gallenga developed an innovative printing process – where a mixture of brass, copper and zinc pigments was block printed or brushed onto fabric – to achieve her designs. Although Gallenga was not the only designer at this time to use these hues, contemporary critics noted that her renderings were especially well-executed and harmonious, and this process would become her signature. Throughout her career, Gallenga collaborated with other Italian artists as well as showcased their creations in her boutiques in Italy and Paris. Many of her textiles from the 1920s and 1930s feature patterns designed by leading Italian artists, such as painter and glassmaker Vittorio Zecchin, husband-and-wife painters Carlo and Fides Testi, and architect Emanuele Cito di Filomarino.

In these collaborations, the artists would supply the design, and Gallenga would determine its scale, color and the cloth on which it would be printed. While many of her domestic textiles were made of bisso, a lightweight, semi-sheer cotton or linen, she also produced designs in heavier fabrics, such as velvet.
The leafy medallions found on these bed and pillow covers were designed by the Italian costume designer Gino Sensani. Although used as a furnishing fabric here, the pattern was also used on clothing. It is seen on a velvet mantle worn by actress Donna Maria Corsini Carolina in the play “Sogno di una perla,” which debuted in Florence in May 1924.

Laura L. Camerlengo is the Exhibition Assistant in the department of Costume and Textiles at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Her upcoming exhibition, “Reinventing Italy’s Decorative Arts: Velvets and Glass from the Interwar Era,” will feature the work of Maria Monaci Gallenga. She is the author of the DesignFile e-book, The Miser’s Purse.



from Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum http://ift.tt/1sBROX1
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mydarkenedeyes:

Wormholes

1e4h:

Paul Yore