© everlark

havocados:

anogoodrabblerouser:

raideo:

foodwarriornetwork:

The streets of San Francisco are lined with pear, plum and apple trees thanks to ‘guerilla grafters’ secretly grafting fruit-bearing scions onto ornamental, non-fruit bearing trees making fresh fruit free and available to everyone who wishes to pick some.

'All you have to do is make a slit with a knife in a branch on the host tree, insert a branch from a fruit-bearing tree, and secure it with tape.  Once it heals, it connects.” — Tara Hui started the movement and has been grafting fruit branches to city trees for two years now.

How great would it be to see free fruit from guerilla grafters growing in your city?  Want to start a trend?

yo my grandpa has done this with some trees on our property so we got some weird ass trees LOL

fucking frankenstein monster trees

best shit ever

situationist international graffiti from the 1968 paris riots 

shakespeareandpunk:

thymoss:

spirallingmadness:

fuckyeahexistentialism:

image

‘It is forbidden to forbid’

image

‘Live without dead time’

image

‘How can you think freely in the shadow of a chapel’

image

‘Under the pavement, the beach’

image

‘Never work’

image

‘Create or die’

image

‘The power is in the street not the polls’

(via procrastinationcollection)

"

It reminds me of the “bike to work” movement. That is also portrayed as white, but in my city more than half of the people on bike are not white. I was once talking to a white activist who was photographing “bike commuters” and had only pictures of white people with the occasional “black professional” I asked her why she didn’t photograph the delivery people, construction workers etc. … ie. the black and Hispanic and Asian people… and she mumbled something about trying to “improve the image of biking” then admitted that she didn’t really see them as part of the “green movement” since they “probably have no choice” –

I was so mad I wanted to quit working on the project she and I were collaborating on.

So, in the same way when people in a poor neighborhood grow food in their yards … it’s just being poor– but when white people do it they are saving the earth or something.

"

 
- comment left on the Racialious blog post “Sustainable Food & Priviledge: Why is Green always White (and Male and Upper-Class)

"

My rage is made all the more sure by those who are “encouraging” black people not to “riot.” They urge us to follow and respect the rule of law.

Because, of course, it is black people who need to be reminded of the rules.

Even though it is we who peacefully assembled by the thousands all over the country and marched in order to turn the wheels of due process. And it is we who waited patiently for 15 months for this case to be brought to trial. And it is we who have yet again been played for fools as we waited fervently for justice to be done.

On the other hand, George Zimmerman deputized himself, sought a confrontation and then became judge, jury and executioner for a kid who committed no crimes.

To ask black people to respect the rule of law is an exercise in missing the point, not to mention an insult.
Almost immediately upon hearing the verdict, I was reminded of Ida B. Wells, who penned these words in an 1892 pamphlet titled “Southern Horrors” several months after three of her friends were lynched with impunity in Memphis:

The lesson this teaches and which every Afro-American should ponder well, is that a Winchester rifle should have a place of honor in every black home, and it should be used for that protection which the law refuses to give. When the white man who is always the aggressor knows he runs as great [a] risk of biting the dust every time his Afro-American victim does, he will have greater respect for Afro-American life.

Though her calls for armed and vigorous self-defense strike a chord with me in this moment when I’m not feeling particularly pacifistic, I am more intrigued by the intrinsic question at the heart of her statement.

How does black life come to have value in a white supremacist system, if not through the use of violence?

Rather than preaching to black people about not rioting, these are the kinds of questions we should be asking and answering. What alternatives are there when the system fails? It should be clear by now, that despite centuries of being disappointed by the system, African-Americans believe in the value and potential of this democracy more than even white people do. We shed our lives for it; sacrifice our dignity to it; and internalize our anger in the face of it.

Still we are spat upon and mocked, our children and loved ones killed, our anger swiftly policed and contained.

I wish I had answers to soothe my worries, optimism to soothe my rage.

I do know a change had better come. Because as James Baldwin said in the epigraph to one of my favorite collections of his essays, “God gave Noah the rainbow sign. No more water. The fire next time.”

"

 

claravoyant:

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Around the U.S.: Justice for Trayvon Martin Actions

Baltimore, MD

Justice for Trayvon Martin! Jail George Zimmerman Demonstration

Sunday 7/14 5:00pm

McKelden Square, Pratt & Light Streets

Zimmerman was acquitted! We are calling on all concerned people, groups: churches, students, unions, and community to come out to express our outrage! Say No to Racist Injustices!

Boston, MA

Sunday 7/14 5:30pm

Dudley Square Roxbury

Buffalo, NY

Fight Racist Violence and Justice for Trayvon Rally

Sunday 7/14 5:00 – 7:00pm

Corner of Bailey Ave and Kensington Ave

March starts promptly at 5:00pm and the rally at Bailey and Langfield will start at 6:00pm

www.facebook.com/events/177437225767527/

Charlotte, NC

Sunday 7/14 6:00pm

Marshall Park 800 E Third St

Denver, CO

Justice for Trayvon!

Sunday 7/14 2:00pm

Denver City Park

1700 York St – by MLK Statue

Detroit, MI

Sunday 7/14 6:00pm

Grand Circus Park

#hoodiesup

Travon Martin Organizing Committee TravonOC.wordpress.com

Greensboro, NC

Trayvon Martin Vigil and Speak Out

Sunday 7/14 5:00 – 9:00pm

Elm St. & Feb. 1 Plaza

Houston, TX

Sunday 7/14 6:00pm

Houston City Hall 901 Bagby

#hoodiesup

Occupy Houston

Los Angeles, CA

Justice for Trayvon Martin!

Leimert Park tonight!

Sunday 4:00pm at MLK and Crenshaw Blvd.

Phone: 323-306-6240 for more information

Madison, WI

Justice for Trayvon: Hoodie Rally

Sunday 5:00pm until 8:00pm

The verdict is in – after only 16 hours of deliberation, George Zimmerman was found not guilty of second degree murder for shooting Trayvon Martin last year.

No Justice, No Peace!

/www.facebook.com/events/490185657728508/

Newark, NJ

Emergency demonstration for Trayvon Martin

Sunday June 14 2:00pm

Broad & Market

#‎justicefortrayvon‬

Oakland, CA

Occupy Oakland

Gathering at Oscar Grant Plaza Tonite in response to the verdict

Rally Monday 6:00pm at Oscar Grant Plaza

Bring your hoodies and rage!

#J4TM #hoodiesup #oo

Raleigh/Durham, NC

Justice for Trayvon Martin!

Raleigh – Sunday 7/14 3:00pm

Durham – Sunday 7/14 6:00pm Rally at courthouse

New York City, NY

SHOW YOUR OUTRAGE IN THE STREETS!

Sunday, July 14 1:00pm Gather at Union Square 14th St and Broadway – Manhattan

  • No to racism, police brutality and racial profiling!
  • Jobs and schools, not jails!
  • End mass incarceration and deportations!
  • End stop & frisk and the war on youth!

#HoodiesUp for Trayvon – ALL OUT NYC!

Sunday, July 14 6:00pm Union Square 14th St and Broadway – Manhattan

It has been decided: black life isn’t worth shit.

Come together in force across the country Sunday at 6pm.

Let’s not ask for justice

The clergy won’t save us

The politicians damn sure won’t save us

ONLY WE CAN SAVE OURSELVES

Take Court to the streets.

www.facebook.com/events/677623498930010/

trayvonoc.wordpress.com

San Diego, CA

Stand With Trayvon Martin!

Rally on the day of the verdict

5:30pm at Highland Park – on Fairmount between Wightman and Landis

Hear from the family of Victor Ortega, shot and killed by SDPD on June 4, 2012

 

is there any action in philly?

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Rally and news conference announces upcoming march to Harrisburg to demand ‘A People’s Budget, Not a Prison Budget,’ May 14, 2013.

Info on the march, which kicks off May 25 at Love Park

Photo: Decarcerate PA

fabianromero:

[image of rallying students, some with illegible signs in their hands, some arm in arm.]
thepeoplesrecord:

How a few Philly high school students organized themselves into a few hundred in four daysMay 9, 2013
It began, not surprisingly perhaps, with a modest online message.
About two weeks ago, school district officials had announced, once again, a serious hole in the District’s budget and had laid out, once again, severe cuts that would be implemented if a roughly $300 million hole wasn’t filled — this time invoking layoffs and cuts to programs, especially arts and extracurricular.
And as students pondered cuts to their favorite programs, the irony that last Friday would mark “Teacher Appreciation Day,” was not lost upon them.
Before news of the proposed cuts reached them, says Teyin Tseng (upper right), a member of the student council at the Philadelphia High School for the Creative and Performing Arts, “Our plan was to see how much money we had and see if we could buy flowers for every teacher.”
“But then the budget [was unveiled] — and we decided to do this.”
So, on Friday, another CAPA student, Maureen Smith (lower center), created a new Facebook page: Silenced Students March — announcing a plan by her and some of her classmates to protest the threatened cuts. She opened with something of a rallying call:
“As students we are fed up and want to be heard. Its OUR education and WE should have a say in it. TUESDAY May 7th is teachers appreciation day, we are organizing a march to 440 North Broad Street, which is the school district building. Depending on your school’s location you can choose a meeting area and then proceed to march to 440.We will all be meeting there by 4:30. There is strength in numbers.”
The response — recorded online in blow-by-blow Facebook posts — was immediate, enthusiastic, and complex as any overnight organizing effort.
Talking points were discussed; a deliberate effort to attract media and control the message was conceived.
And there was, as there is in any organizing effort, vigorous debate over tactics and message: When some students announced a planned walkout; other students objected, worried the organized disobedience would undermine their credibility as a group — a debate which continues as some students contemplate a walkout tomorrow.
A system was worked out: each school’s protest contingent should nominate  a representative to contact.
“We have a huge network,” explained Tseng outside the building. “We all called each other, and we got a lot of schools to join.”
“I was contacted by Teyin over here,” said Belal Shami (lower left), “and he told me he needed my help. My role was to gather people from Franklin Learning Center and get them to the protest. … I brought roughly 35 people.”
In a stretch of years in which there has been no shortage of protests outside 440 N. Broad, yesterday nonetheless marked the first time many of these students had ever done anything of the sort. And their motivations often went beyond their personal welfare.
“People are saying, ‘You’re a Senior,’ why are you here?’ Well, I have friends that I’ve made this year in lower grades,” said Kelechi Ekwerike (upper left), for whom this protest was his first. “For their education to be cut short, truncated, I will not stand for that. And if this carries on next year, if nothing is done, they [the School District] will not hear the end of it.”
“The sense in my class is a little bit like we’re the last survivors on the Titanic,” is how Samantha Ho (upper center), a junior at Masterman High School, put it. “We survived. But I have a cousin who’s going to be first year at Masterman —  I can’t really imagine that place without extracurricular activities. That’s where people connect.”
“My little brother, my sister — I don’t care about myself,” said Spencer Nguyen (lower right) from the Palumbo Academy of Art. “This is for future generations.”
About two hours after the protest had started, a small knot of these students remained outside school headquarters, huddled as they debriefed and planned for whatever comes next.
“I’m more than happy with the turnout,” acknowledged Facebook event creator Maureen Smith. “It really does speak volumes, that young people can make a difference.”
SourceFrom the Philadelphia Student Union: Today, hundreds of students walked-out of school and took to the streets. We rallied at City Hall to tell City Council that we need funding for our public schools. We have had enough budget cuts. We marched down Broad St. to 440. Students are ready to fight back against budget cut backs. Get ready to see a lot more of us next time.

fabianromero:

[image of rallying students, some with illegible signs in their hands, some arm in arm.]

thepeoplesrecord:

How a few Philly high school students organized themselves into a few hundred in four days
May 9, 2013

It began, not surprisingly perhaps, with a modest online message.

About two weeks ago, school district officials had announced, once again, a serious hole in the District’s budget and had laid out, once again, severe cuts that would be implemented if a roughly $300 million hole wasn’t filled — this time invoking layoffs and cuts to programs, especially arts and extracurricular.

And as students pondered cuts to their favorite programs, the irony that last Friday would mark “Teacher Appreciation Day,” was not lost upon them.

Before news of the proposed cuts reached them, says Teyin Tseng (upper right), a member of the student council at the Philadelphia High School for the Creative and Performing Arts, “Our plan was to see how much money we had and see if we could buy flowers for every teacher.”

“But then the budget [was unveiled] — and we decided to do this.”

So, on Friday, another CAPA student, Maureen Smith (lower center), created a new Facebook page: Silenced Students March — announcing a plan by her and some of her classmates to protest the threatened cuts. She opened with something of a rallying call:

“As students we are fed up and want to be heard. Its OUR education and WE should have a say in it. TUESDAY May 7th is teachers appreciation day, we are organizing a march to 440 North Broad Street, which is the school district building. Depending on your school’s location you can choose a meeting area and then proceed to march to 440.We will all be meeting there by 4:30. There is strength in numbers.”

The response — recorded online in blow-by-blow Facebook posts — was immediate, enthusiastic, and complex as any overnight organizing effort.

Talking points were discussed; a deliberate effort to attract media and control the message was conceived.

And there was, as there is in any organizing effort, vigorous debate over tactics and message: When some students announced a planned walkout; other students objected, worried the organized disobedience would undermine their credibility as a group — a debate which continues as some students contemplate a walkout tomorrow.

A system was worked out: each school’s protest contingent should nominate  a representative to contact.

“We have a huge network,” explained Tseng outside the building. “We all called each other, and we got a lot of schools to join.”

“I was contacted by Teyin over here,” said Belal Shami (lower left), “and he told me he needed my help. My role was to gather people from Franklin Learning Center and get them to the protest. … I brought roughly 35 people.”

In a stretch of years in which there has been no shortage of protests outside 440 N. Broad, yesterday nonetheless marked the first time many of these students had ever done anything of the sort. And their motivations often went beyond their personal welfare.

“People are saying, ‘You’re a Senior,’ why are you here?’ Well, I have friends that I’ve made this year in lower grades,” said Kelechi Ekwerike (upper left), for whom this protest was his first. “For their education to be cut short, truncated, I will not stand for that. And if this carries on next year, if nothing is done, they [the School District] will not hear the end of it.”

“The sense in my class is a little bit like we’re the last survivors on the Titanic,” is how Samantha Ho (upper center), a junior at Masterman High School, put it. “We survived. But I have a cousin who’s going to be first year at Masterman —  I can’t really imagine that place without extracurricular activities. That’s where people connect.”

“My little brother, my sister — I don’t care about myself,” said Spencer Nguyen (lower right) from the Palumbo Academy of Art. “This is for future generations.”

About two hours after the protest had started, a small knot of these students remained outside school headquarters, huddled as they debriefed and planned for whatever comes next.

“I’m more than happy with the turnout,” acknowledged Facebook event creator Maureen Smith. “It really does speak volumes, that young people can make a difference.”

Source

From the Philadelphia Student UnionToday, hundreds of students walked-out of school and took to the streets. We rallied at City Hall to tell City Council that we need funding for our public schools. We have had enough budget cuts. We marched down Broad St. to 440. Students are ready to fight back against budget cut backs. Get ready to see a lot more of us next time.

After Thatcher: the 'Don't Hate, Donate' initiative  

“Don’t Hate, Donate: Be the society Thatcher said didn’t exist”. That is the message of a website (http://donthatedonate.com/) established in the wake of news of the death of former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher today (8 April 2013), following a major stroke and long-term illness.

The aim of this initiative is positive, creative and compassionate: to encourage those who wish to continue to stand in solidarity with the victims of Thatcherite policies, and who wish to respond to their progenitor’s death in an honest way (but without rancour), to support actively the causes and campaigns of homeless people, miners’ families, Hillsborough survivors, victims of apartheid, gay teenagers, and many others.

soyonscruels:

look, i get that people like writing about les amis as a contemporary radical activist group, but i’ve seen a lot of stuff that… doesn’t really reflect the reality of protest in virtually every country in the world, and certainly in basically every western democracy. at a protest today enjolras would have to beg the local institutions of power for permission to march up a public street, and he would be held responsible for any diversion from the plan he submitted. if his friends and followers were kettled and terrorised by riot police, he’d be told in no uncertain terms that this was his fault. les amis would have to hole up in someone’s flat beforehand and duct-tape and stuff cardboard inside of their jackets, in advance preparation for the inevitable police violence to come. they’d have to write the phone numbers of lawyers on their arms in magic marker and combeferre would have to check that everyone knows not to tell the police a single thing, to always ask for a lawyer, and then shut up.

enjolras would have to give his speeches with bahorel and feuilly standing on either side of him with their arms folded and their faces set, would have to march with jehan and courferyac pushing forward as his vanguard. les amis would have to surround enjolras like a tidal wave, in case the police got any bright ideas about cutting off the serpent’s head in order to make the body flail and panic and die. if and when the violence started — violence enjolras probably would not have wanted, because violence is used to re-write the history of contemporary resistance all of the time — courferyac and graintaire would have to pay in bruises to distract the cop bearing down on combeferre so it would be definite that someone would be left in the morning to post bail. joly would have to bring medical supplies in his bag with the full expectation of using them, because kettles can go on for hours and you never guarantee that even someone bleeding enough to lose their life will be allowed to leave.

when the cops come for enjolras, he’d kneel and put his hands behind his head and not say a thing, not when they kicked at the backs of his ankles or slammed him against a cop car or pulled his head back by his hair to hiss his rights into his ear. he’s a leader, and he’d know the value of a slit through his eyebrow in the press tomorrow. he’d know that this beating was coming whatever he did, but bruises in the dock in the morning make his argument for him. courferyac would, again, be the one dragged out of the crowd with his lip split and grantaire gripping tight around his wrist in vain, so combeferre could try and desperately usher away teenagers from riot shields, so joly could try and stem the bleeding of a thirteen year old girl’s head-wound, so bahorel could help jehan carry feuilly away without putting too much pressure on the point where his ribs had cracked. no one would hit a cop. if you hit a cop, a cop can do whatever they like to you, and every single member of les amis would have seen that happen with their own eyes.

the reality remains that there is virtually no such thing as a peaceful protest, because it is to the advantage of those in power to ensure that there’s not. the reality remains that there is nothing glamorous about a riot, and that enjolras would be taking his friends’ lives in his hands with reckless abandon if he thought there was. in a sense he’d be happy if he was the only person arrested, that combeferre would have to come for him in the cold light of morning and pick him up from the police station steps and drive him to the hospital, dirt under enjolras’s fingernails and blood crusted in his hair.

he’d have spent a night cold and maybe alone and maybe sitting in an interrogation room for hours staring at bare walls and having cops yell questions in his face that he couldn’t risk answering. he’d be exhausted and sore and on the verge of total-shut down. every single protest he led, he’d have to know that this would be how it could end for him— if not something much worse. protest is dangerous. riots aren’t fun. les amis would be covered in battle scars. they would spend weeks showered in bruises and knowing that they would have more to come. in the 21st century, protesters still build barricades. in fact, they do so relatively regularly. it’s just a thought, but you might want to think about why.

caterinasforzas:

#REVOLUTION IS A PROCESS #REVOLUTION IS A DIALOGUE #REVOLUTION IS AN ACT OF LOVE #OF SELF LOVE #OF LOVE OF HUMANITY #REVOLUTION IS HUMANIZING

caterinasforzas:

#REVOLUTION IS A PROCESS #REVOLUTION IS A DIALOGUE #REVOLUTION IS AN ACT OF LOVE #OF SELF LOVE #OF LOVE OF HUMANITY #REVOLUTION IS HUMANIZING

mumblingsage:

shwetanarayan:

questionall:

These rape protesters in India might be our new favorite people. They’re reacting to widespread comments about skirts being the cause of rape, seriously. Let’s get something straight, the only thing responsible for rape is a rapist, if you’re blaming a woman’s clothes for her rape you’re clueless.

I also love that the one sign I can read says “Don’t skirt the issue”.

The rape protesters in India in general are fast becoming my favorite people.

mumblingsage:

shwetanarayan:

questionall:

These rape protesters in India might be our new favorite people. They’re reacting to widespread comments about skirts being the cause of rape, seriously.

Let’s get something straight, the only thing responsible for rape is a rapist, if you’re blaming a woman’s clothes for her rape you’re clueless.

I also love that the one sign I can read says “Don’t skirt the issue”.

The rape protesters in India in general are fast becoming my favorite people.


School for black civil rights activists; young girl being trained to not react to smoke blown in her face, 1960
photo by Eve Arnold

School for black civil rights activists; young girl being trained to not react to smoke blown in her face, 1960

photo by Eve Arnold

notyrcisterpress:


Our comrades at Untorelli Press just put out a collection of essays and communiques called Dangerous Spaces: Violent Resistance, Self-Defense, and Insurrectional Struggle Against Gender.  It includes some stuff we’ve posted in the past and a lot of cool action and analysis surrounding the struggle against gender.  Check it out!

notyrcisterpress:

Our comrades at Untorelli Press just put out a collection of essays and communiques called Dangerous Spaces: Violent Resistance, Self-Defense, and Insurrectional Struggle Against Gender.  It includes some stuff we’ve posted in the past and a lot of cool action and analysis surrounding the struggle against gender.  Check it out!

"…on the day before Thanksgiving, the day after and the 362 other days of the year (including Christmas) hardly any volunteers, well known or not, showed up to help. So please, kick back this Thanksgiving and enjoy a good meal guilt-free (or attend an anti-colonial protest) with friends if your family get on your nerves. Then go volunteer at the shelter another day—weekly or monthly, because like any other activity—biking, dancing, fucking—you’ll be more skilled if you do it more than once a year."

 
tranqualizer:

tranqualizer:

we hijacked the front steps of the charlotte observer because they wouldn’t stop using the i-word in their pieces about undocumented immigrants. 
they did not like us for being there a week straight

no human is illegal!
take the pledge to Drop the i-word

tranqualizer:

tranqualizer:

we hijacked the front steps of the charlotte observer because they wouldn’t stop using the i-word in their pieces about undocumented immigrants. 

they did not like us for being there a week straight

no human is illegal!

take the pledge to Drop the i-word