© everlark

mizoguchi:

Aissa Maiga by Ben Dauchez

mizoguchi:

Aissa Maiga by Ben Dauchez

"So please ask yourself: What would I do if I weren’t afraid? And then go do it."

 
- Sheryl Sandberg, Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead (via larmoyante)
fibrearts:

sewing loteria (by sayyestohoneytoast)

fibrearts:

sewing loteria (by sayyestohoneytoast)

vaginageorge:

jeremy scott

"But it turned out that Joan was really, uncannily good at leading an army. She had skills that no female person who’d spent her life tending house — the thing she was best at, she later told a room full of men, was sewing — had any reason to possess. “She was quite innocent, unless it be in warfare,” says the former roommate. “She rode on horseback and handled the lance like the best of the knights, and the soldiers marveled.” Uh, yeah: I’ll bet they did.

So it turned out she was good, and you all know this part of the story. She was very good at it, despite the fact that she was initially excluded from the important meetings, and despite the fact that she had no training, and despite the fact that she was a woman and people weren’t supposed to listen to those — “harlot,” was a common theory among the English at the time, because what would a woman be doing in the army unless was sleeping with all of the soldiers; one English soldier straight-up laughed at the idea of “surrendering to a woman” — and despite the fact that her whole authority was based on telling people that she had magic powers. She took an arrow in the neck, in the middle of a battle, and kept fighting. If you want to get a sense of what actually made it possible for her to get from a kitchen in the middle of nowhere, to standing in front of the King and making her case, to a leadership position in the military, to leading this one particular hopeless lost cause of a battle, the Siege of Orleans, and winning it, this is instructive. If you want to get a sense of the sheer willpower driving this woman, think about being just a little female teenager from nowhere with no military training, whose biggest talent was sewing, shoved into chaotic, close-range, hugely violent battle, and about what it would take for you not to freak the fuck out at this point, what it would take to keep fighting with an arrow in your neck."

 
- Running Towards The Gunshots: A Few Words About Joan of Arc (via gatheringbones)

shantellmartin:

Drawing on People. On June 28th I invited people to become a part of my solo show at MoCADA Museum by allowing me to draw on them.

bofransson:

Flowers
Louis Valtat

bofransson:

Flowers

Louis Valtat

heyfranhey:

shamelessmaya:

I  L O V E  T H E  8 0 S

Whew!

lyndsayfaye:

fashion-runways:

RAMI KADI Un Souffle d’Orient Collection

Ye gods.

poetsandwriters:

Robert D. Richardson on Ralph Waldo Emerson, from First We Read, Then We Write: Emerson on the Creative Process.

poetsandwriters:

Robert D. Richardson on Ralph Waldo Emerson, from First We Read, Then We Write: Emerson on the Creative Process.

nevver:

X-ray specs, Carrie Witherell

sandersonfarquhar:

pinebark:

do you ever think about how we’ve set up our communities so that:

  1. our primary response to harm (insofar as we actually respond at all) is expulsion/exile
  2. resisting or even questioning that impulse is considered siding with those who harm or possibly even tacit admission of one’s own membership in the category of people who harm
  3. we act as if there were conveniently two kinds of easily-identifiable people, those who deliberately harm and those who are harmed
  4. distinguishing between the two categories is often done on the basis of whoever shouts first and the loudest

pretty cool, you guys

i think about this a lot

nevver:

Everybody in the water, Lizzy Stewart